Archive for the ‘Mission Briefings and Classified Materials’ Category

Project Arondight is a team of Scions–the earthly children of godly parents (either born or adopted). The team operates under the auspices of SIS (aka MI6) and the command of Brigadier General Arthur Craddock. The current team members are:

Rebecca Bernstein (Code Name: Arkangel, daughter of Bast):

Rebecca is about 26 and the youngest team member. She is a Scion of Bast. She is fluent in English, Arabic, and Hebrew and holds a degree in law from the University of London. She’s an excellent administrator, but lacks some dedicated field experience.

Elizabeth Tracey (Code Name: Aegis, daughter of Athena, alias Victoria Melton)

Elizabeth Tracey is an alias for Victoria Melton, a third generation Scion of Athena (adopted; her true godly parent is Zeus). She appears to be around 30, but is actually over 50 years old. Her grandfather was a WW II hero. She is cool, calculating, and ruthless, but very skilled in seeing the big picture and coming up with strategic plans. She is idealistic despite her seeming lack of humor. Her father was friends with Sutton-Fiennes. Aegis is sort of the team mastermind and to outsiders appears to have symptoms of Asperger’s Syndrome. Sutton-Fiennes suspect this is some sort of curse by Hera, tired of her husband’s philandering ways….

Rupert Jones (Code Name: Dyrnwyn, son of Heimdall, alias Anthony Summers)

Rupert Jones is a former SAS assassin. He’s deadly with a lot of weapons, including his bare hands. He attended a polytechnic school and also is skilled in basic mechanical engineering. He is chafing a bit at his current ‘guard duty’ assignment and wants to be more in the heart of the action. Although he looks to be around 40, he’s over 70 years of age.

Helene Peacock, Baroness Stornoway (Code Name: Ascalaon, daughter of Aphrodite–adopted, alias Emma Burton Redford)

Helene Peacock has a public persona and writes best selling romantic historical mysteries. She is beautiful and quite witty for a woman born in the 1870s. In her spare time, she writes romantic mysteries. Her role on the team is social, but she can contribute to a fight when necessary. She’s good at getting the team into places where the others may be out of their comfort zone. Like Sutton-Fiennes, she has had to ‘disappear’ and then reappear later in a new identity.

Victor Sutton-Fiennes, Viscount Thundridge (Code Name: Glaukos, son of Athena–adopted)

Victor is from a minor English noble family that gained fame as soldiers; his first war was, in fact, the Great War. Except for some downtime between 1944-64, he’s followed in the family business. Victor, however, is much more of a strategist and likes to ‘think ahead’ of the enemy. He finds the current situation especially disturbing as the attackers did not target any classic ‘symbols’ of the British Empire, but rather seemed to plan a slow, lingering death for London and its immediate surroundings.

Bombing Locations and Known Damage,
Report, August 10, 0600 GMT

1. Lambeth

The following structures are destroyed or believed to be damaged beyond repair:

  • Lambeth Palace
  • The London Eye
  • St. Thomas Hospital

The following structures received major damage/require extensive repairs:

  • Parliament Buildings
  • Waterloo Station
  • Tate Gallery

The following structures are mildly-moderately damaged, but repairable:

  • Vauxhall Bridge (avoid pedestrian and motorized traffic use)
  • Big Ben

Notes:

This is believed to have been the first bomb to detonate, perhaps 30 seconds before the remaining bombs. The proximity of several large, reinforced buildings stopped the spread of the ground burst in some directions. Initial analysis has considered the Archbishop of Canterbury to have been a possible target, as well as the SIS Building.

2. Battersea

The following structures are destroyed or believed to be damaged beyond repair:

  • Nine Elms neighborhood
  • Chelsea Bridge
  • Lister Hospital
  • Battersea Park (all persons present were killed on detonation)
  • All railways in area

The following structures received major damage/require extensive repairs:

  • Royal Hospital Chelsea

Notes:

Damage in Battersea was more severe than in Lambeth for two key reasons—first, there was a minor synergy effect from the proximity of both bombs; second, the lack of large, heavy buildings allowed the ground burst more yield/spread.

3. Chelsea and Westminster Hospital

The following structures are destroyed or believed to be damaged beyond repair:

  • Westminster Hospital

The following structures received major damage/require extensive repairs:

  • Brompton Hospital
  • Royal Marsden Hospital
  • New Brompton and National Heart Hospital
  • Most residential structures

Notes:

Initial analysis considers the major target of this bomb to be the group of hospitals which sustained extensive damage.

4. Kensington Palace/Russian Embassy Blocks

The following structures are destroyed or believed to be damaged beyond repair:

  • Western portion of Kensington Gardens—all persons in the area were killed upon detonation
  • Kensington Palace
  • The Russian Embassy
  • Notting Hill neighborhood

The following structures received major damage/require extensive repairs:

  • Albert Memorial
  • Hyde Park
  • College of Science, Technology, and Medicine

The following structures are mildly-moderately damaged, but repairable:

  • Most residential structures

Notes:

The entire park area is irradiated and considered extremely dangerous. The Kensington/Maida Vale/London Zoo bombs created a significant synergy effect, enhanced by the open areas of Kensington and Hyde Parks.

5. Maida Vale/Warwick

The following structures received major damage/require extensive repairs:

  • BBC Studios
  • All roadways and rails
  • St. Mary’s Hospital
  • Paddington Station
  • Most area churches

The following structures are mildly-moderately damaged, but repairable:

  • Most residential structures

Notes:

The entire park area is irradiated and considered extremely dangerous. The Kensington/Maida Vale/London Zoo bombs created a significant synergy effect, enhanced by the open areas of Kensington and Hyde Parks. Initial intelligence believes the major target in this area was the BBC Studio.

6. London Zoo

The following structures are destroyed or believed to be damaged beyond repair:

  • The London Zoo
  • The London Central Mosque and Islamic Cultural Centre

The following structures received major damage/require extensive repairs:

  • The Royal College of Physicians and Regents College

Notes:

The entire area is irradiated and considered extremely dangerous. The Kensington/Maida Vale/London Zoo bombs created a significant synergy effect, enhanced by the open areas of Kensington and Hyde Parks, and the Regents Park/London Zoo area.

7. Shoreditch Park

The following structures received major damage/require extensive repairs:

  • Most residential structures

The following structures are mildly-moderately damaged, but repairable:

  • A number of churches and community centres

Notes:

Initial intelligence indicates this bomb may have detonated before it reached its primary target.

8. Guy’s Hospital

The following structures are destroyed or believed to be damaged beyond repair:

  • Guy’s Hospital
  • The Shard

The following structures received major damage/require extensive repairs:

  • Tower Bridge (no foot or motorized traffic)
  • The Globe Theatre

Notes:

Initial intelligence reports suggest the hospital was the major target in the area, though the high number of local tourists may be considered a secondary target. The area seems to have a slightly higher level of radiation remaining than do the other target areas.

9. Areas 9a, 9b, 9c, 9d: All in proximity to the M25, these targets are believed to have been chosen to block/disrupt transit routes to/from London. All areas sustained heavy damage to residential structures and various levels of radiation.

  • 9a: Basingstoke
  • 9b: Enfield
  • 9c: Watford
  • 9d: Woking
  • 9e: Uxbridge

Transportation Infrastructure Preliminary Report

Due to the series of EMP emissions, no trains or cars in the central London area/areas 9a-e are functioning. Some train and automobile functionality is apparent in the ‘rim’ between the M25 and central London, outside the 9a-e cities. Military personnel have established roadblocks just outside the M25 on all roads of two lanes or greater heading into the London area. Within London, the following underground stations are known to have taken heavy damage, though the list is considered incomplete:

  • London Bridge
  • Borough
  • Elephant and Castle
  • Lambeth North
  • Waterloo
  • Vauxhall (SIS reports this is repairable)
  • Kensington
  • Battersea Park
  • Queenstown Road
  • West Brompton
  • High Street Kensington
  • Queensway (completely destroyed)
  • Bayswater
  • Paddington
  • Warwick Avenue (completely destroyed)
  • Maida Vale
  • St. John’s Wood
  • Regent’s Park
  • Baker Street
  • Marylebone
  • Camden Town
  • Notting Hill Gate (completely destroyed)

 

 


 

Tactical Recommendations

1. Primary mission is rescue of persons on cabinet list (see spreadsheet file).

2. Secondary mission is contact and collection of data at Vauxhall/SIS Building. This includes collection of radiation samples from explosion locations if considered within safe parameters.

3. Tertiary mission is rescue of Prince Harry.

Notes:

1. If any above personnel fall into Casualty Rank 1, recommend Anubis Protocol.

2. Casualty Rank 2 and 3 personnel to be evacuated to Birmingham central rendezvous point.

Location of Prince Harry of Wales–Unconfirmed

Last known to be at Olympic Stadium, Olympic Park

Stratford, London, Greater London E20 2ST, United Kingdom

0845 267 2012